What Foods Are Safe For Dogs at Thanksgiving?

 

Is your dog joining you at the Thanksgiving table this year? Thanksgiving is right around the corner, and if your dog is like most dogs, they will definitely be joining in on the food fun!

Sure you technically should not give your dog people food. But, it’s Thanksgiving.  Our dogs are part of the family. A poll from PetMD says that 56 percent of people do give their pets some food on Thanksgiving.

It is perfectly fine to give your dog small pieces of turkey as a treat or mix it with their regular food.

The question is: Which Thanksgiving snacks are safe for dogs and which are not? 

Thanksgiving classics like turkey, stuffing, pumpkin pie, cranberry sauce or mashed potatoes to our furry friends under the table. But what may be delicious to us, may not be safe for our pups.

Here’s a look at some Thanksgiving foods that are OK for dogs to eat, and which you should avoid:

 

Safe:

1. Turkey

It’s not Thanksgiving without turkey. And dogs can eat lean protein, so giving your pup a little Thanksgiving turkey is absolutely fine. Just make sure that you’ve taken out any bones that your dog could choke on and take off the skin. The gravy, though, could be too much for your dog.

2. Sweet Potatoes

A little bit of sweet potato is a great snack for your dog. You might want to skip it, though, if you add marshmallows to your sweet potatoes. And definitely, check to make sure there’s no Xylitol in your marshmallows if you do add them.

3. Macaroni and Cheese

Who doesn’t love mac n cheese? You could give your dog some macaroni and cheese as a Thanksgiving snack as long as you know that your dog can handle the dairy well. If not, a piece of a roll could be good.

4. Vegetables

Vegetables are always a great, healthy treat for your dog. And there are plenty of options on Thanksgiving. Hand over some carrots or some green beans for your pup to crunch away on.

5. Mashed Potatoes

Mashed potatoes would be fine to give to your dog. But as Care.com points out, it depends on how you make them. If you add onions, garlic, chives, or leeks, for example, you should definitely skip the potatoes.

6. Cranberry Sauce

Similarly, a little cranberry sauce should be OK for your pup, but it depends on how it’s prepared. If you’re adding macadamia nuts or raisins, then you definitely should not give it to your dog. Some canned cranberry sauce, too, could have too much sugar for your dog to handle.

Unsafe:

1. Pumpkin Pie

Pumpkin isn’t bad for dogs. In fact, vets recommend you give your dog a little pumpkin when they’re having digestive issues. But pumpkin pie can have spices like nutmeg, which is very bad for dogs. And you might not want to give your dog too much pumpkin if they’re not having stomach problems.

2. Stuffing

While some stuffing could be OK for dogs, Vet Street points out that a lot of bad ingredients could potentially be added to the stuffing. If you don’t know what’s in the stuffing, or you know it has garlic, onions, leeks, scallions, grapes, raisins, or unhealthy spices, it’s best to avoid the stuffing.

The Real Reason Dogs Eat Poop – And How to Make Them Stop

Many dogs start eating poop because their bodies are prodding them to correct an insufficiency or imbalance in the digestive process. Some dogs eat poop because they are anxious, frustrated, bored or stressed. Younger dogs that don’t have behavior problems can pick up the habit from other, more anxious, canines in the family.

If your dog is stressed, he might eat non-food objects besides animal waste. If your dog shreds anything he can, he may be telling you that he needs more play time. He may be hungry or seeking minerals lacking in their regular food.

Did you know that there is a technical term for poop-eating? Coprophagia is the scientific term. Coprophagia is almost always done by healthy dogs. Almost 25 percent of dogs have been observed eating poop.

How to treat Coprophagia
There are no proven methods to stop dogs from eating feces 100 percent of the time. The best way to stop the behavior is to prevent it. Pick up poop from the yard immediately and don’t make the cat litter box accessible to your canine.
*Change the dog’s diet. Buy or prepare only nutritious, quality food that is formulated for dog’s age, breed and any medical issues.
*For the hungry dog – try feeding him a little more, and make sure the food is quality, nutritious food.
*Clean up after your pet, right after he goes.
*Walk the dog on the leash to better watch to make sure they leave the poop alone.

Coprophagia can be a hard habit to break since it is self-reinforcing, but do not get discouraged. Follow these tips and give them a chance to work.